John Adams

John Adams

Since the purpose of Founder of the Day is to shed light on the lesser known Founding Fathers, this is simply a brief overview of the life of John Adams.  His presence was important throughout the creation of the United States.  It is recommended that you read more about him than is found in this short summary.

John Adams was, quite literally, part of the Revolution from the very beginning.  He was publishing articles against British taxes by the early 1770's.

He was involved in the Boston Massacre when he defended the soldiers who were on trial, because of his belief in the rule of law.

Adams attended the First and Second Continental Congress.

His passion and oratory brought many southerners to join Massachusetts in the war.  It especially helped when he nominated George Washington as Commander of the Continental Army.

Adams also signed, and helped Thomas Jefferson write, the Declaration of Independence.

He would spend most of the 1780's in Europe as a leading diplomat representing the United States and securing much needed loans to win the American Revolution and begin the new government.

It was during this period that the one great event he missed took place, the Constitutional Convention.  He was, however, one of the few signers of the Treaty of Paris which ended the war.  This treaty was official British acknowledgement that the United States was an independent nation.

When he returned home, he was elected the First Vice President of the United State of America.

It is important to remember that during this time there were no campaign tickets.  Everyone cast two votes, whoever came in first was president and whoever came in second was vice president.  This means that after George Washington, John Adams was the person with the second most support to lead the United States.

Adams would go on to be the Second President of the United States of America.

Adams retired to Massachusetts where he corresponded with Thomas Jefferson for the last 15 years of his life.

Further Reading

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson